Mom as Coach

A mother needs to be the world’s best coach all the time. We’ve had a month here that required heavy coaching. Overlaid on the frenzy of the holidays were several “challenges” that we just had to deal with as a family. Read the rest of this entry »

Celebrating Grandmothers at Hanukkah, Part 2

Ethel’s husband disappeared on one mission and she was left to fend for herself and her three children. Budapest was occupied by Nazi forces and conditions became so horrific that even precise descriptions do not permit our minds to fully fathom the terror Ethel must have felt. She worked tirelessly to feed her children and to cook for others who could not care for themselves. Read the rest of this entry »

Celebrating Grandmothers at Hanukkah, Part 1

As we prepare for the holidays, our most important inspirations are our memories, and, for many of us, our grandmothers. Our grandmothers have woven the tapestries of our holiday memories — cooking, with love, food that we still can taste; decorating their homes with surprises we still remember; wishing us well with voices that still resound in our hearts. Even if we did not celebrate with our grandmothers, we have felt their touch in the traditions our mothers and fathers held dear. They seemed to set the standard for how holidays ought to be. Read the rest of this entry »

Some Eye Opening Statistics on Mothers Today

What are mothers doing and who is minding the kids? According to the nonprofit organization, Mothers At Home, the latest Census Bureau figures from 1997 are as follows: Read the rest of this entry »

Blending and Sharing Family Traditions

Celebrating Christmas and Hanukkah, our family continues to find ways to share and blend our rituals. Some traditions are distinct, and we honor them separately: the candles that shine late into the evenings on our menorah; the tree of many colors whose fragrance fills the living room. Read the rest of this entry »

Stella Got Her Groove Back Now You Can Too! Post 2

It’s a Social thing!

The Zen Buddhists say, “If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If still boring, try it for eight, sixteen, thirty-two, and so on. Eventually one discovers that it’s not boring at all but very interesting.” Read the rest of this entry »

Stella Got Her Groove Back Now You Can Too! Post 1

We are quickly approaching the fitness industry’s most profitable time of year. You know, that time of year when we cover our Euro-slim leather belts with puffy, wool turtleneck sweaters because Martha Stewart’s recipes have infiltrated all the holiday dessert tables from Halloween to Valentine’s Day. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Create Great Dialogues With Your Kids Part 2

Another question that seeks specific information is called a focused question. The question might look like this: “What was happening at five o’clock on Saturday?” Starting with a “what” in a sentence usually opens dialogues.

A third question is called a closed question. This one is almost always answered by yes or no, and the answer may be all too familiar to some parents. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Create Great Dialogues With Your Kids Part 1

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if our kids more often were willing to share about how they feel and what they think about in their world and in their everyday life experiences? Many kids fear sharing their thoughts and ideas.

We wonder why some kids become shrinking violets and somehow fade away into the woodwork! As parents, we often find ourselves asking them a lot of questions yet have very few (if any) responses. The answers may be as simple as a child who feels intimidated or criticized, and is afraid to put him or herself on the line. Some kids “shut down,” and refuse to open up. We may almost find ourselves “mind-reading” our kids to get answers. We read between the lines so-to-speak. Our hope is that there can be sharing and bonding with great dialogue. Read the rest of this entry »